COVID-19 Information

3/6/2021-  Who is eligible now for the COVID vaccine?-   https://www.dshs.texas.gov/cor...


1/22/2021- ATTENTION: Allergy Shot Patients- If you have received your COVID VACCINE, you must wait 7 days to get an ALLERGY SHOT or RUSH .  Can't get an ALLERGY SHOT the same day as receiving a COVID VACCINE.


1/21/2021-  COVID VACCINE-

Is there any information regarding severe allergic reaction (e.g.,anaphylaxis) to the vaccines?

The CDC has issued  an updated guidance on allergic reactions associated with COVID-19 vaccines. Please visit the  CDC Clinical Considerations webpage for all the latest updates.

Where can I find more information about each vaccine?

The CDC has specific pages for each vaccine. Information includes Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), standing orders templates, prevaccination screening forms, and storage and handling instructions.

Download recipient fact sheets for both vaccines (CDC).

What are the age indications for each vaccine?

Pfizer: 16 years of age and older

Moderna: 18 years of age and older

What are some reported adverse reactions to each vaccine?

Pfizer: In clinical studies, adverse reactions in participants 16 years of age and older included pain at the injection site (84.1%), fatigue (62.9%), headache (55.1%), muscle pain (38.3%), chills (31.9%), joint pain (23.6%), fever (14.2%), injection site swelling (10.5%), injection ite redness (9.5%), nausea (1.1%), malaise (0.5%), and lymphadenopathy (0.3%).

Moderna: In clinical studies, the adverse reactions in participants 18 years of age and older were pain at the injection site (92.0%), fatigue (70.0%), headache (64.7%), myalgia (61.5%), arthralgia (46.4%), chills (45.4%), nausea/vomiting (23.0%), axillary swelling/tenderness 19.8%), fever (15.5%), swelling at the injection site (14.7%), and erythema at the injection site (10.0%).

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are categorized as mRNA vaccines. How do they work?

COVID-19 mRNA vaccines give instructions for our cells to make a harmless piece of what is called the “spike protein.” The spike protein is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are given in the upper arm muscle. Once the instructions (mRNA) are inside the immune cells, the cells use them to make the protein piece. After the protein piece is made, the cell breaks down the instructions and gets rid of them.

Next, the cell displays the protein piece on its surface. Our immune systems recognize that the protein doesn’t belong there and begin building an immune response and making antibodies, like what happens in natural infection against COVID-19.

At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. The benefit of mRNA vaccines, like all vaccines, is those vaccinated gain this protection without ever having to risk the serious consequences of getting sick with COVID-19.


1/26/2021- ATTENTION: Allergy Shot Patients- If you have received your COVID VACCINE, you must wait 7 days to get an ALLERGY SHOT or RUSH .  Can NOT get an ALLERGY SHOT the same day as receiving a COVID VACCINE.


12/31/2020- We do not and will not have the COVID Vaccine in our office. 

12/30/2020- Texas continues to receive doses of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, and is distributing statewide to hospitals, pharmacies, local health departments, freestanding ERs and other clinics.

Who’s getting the vaccine now?

If you are a front-line healthcare worker or resident of a long-term care facility, you are eligible now to receive the vaccine, since December 14. This group is considered Phase 1A.

If you are in Phase 1B, you are also eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine, depending on availability and the vaccine provider. Vaccine supply remains limited, but more vaccine will be delivered to providers each week. Phase 1B recipients include:

  • People 65 years of age and older
  • People 16 years of age and older with at least one chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19, such as but not limited to:
    • Cancer
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
    • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies
    • Solid organ transplantation
    • Obesity and severe obesity (body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

If you are in Phase 1A or 1B, please visit the Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Provider Locations map to see if and where you might be able to get a vaccine today. Remember, your ability to get a vaccine today or this week will depend on vaccine availability at your provider’s office, clinic, or facility. Please call ahead to your provider.

Who’s getting the vaccine next and when?

The Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP) is considering what criteria could be used for later stages of vaccine distribution. This webpage will be updated when those decisions are completed.

Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccine will be available for the general public, but that may change. It depends on vaccine production and how quickly other vaccines become available.

What do I need to do now?

  • Phase 1A: If you are a healthcare worker, contact your employer. If you are a long-term care resident,
    contact your caretaker.
  • Phase 1B: Please visit the Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Provider Locations map to see vaccine providers near you.
    • Do not show up at a hospital or clinic looking for vaccine.
    • Instead please check their website for information about vaccine availability. Call if the website doesn’t answer your questions.
    Remember, your ability to get a vaccine today or this week will depend on vaccine supply at hospitals, clinics. Texas receives more vaccine shipments each week. Please check this page frequently for updates.
  • https://www.dshs.texas.gov/cor...


12/24/20-   Only if the patient has PEG allergy should the patient be excluded. Here is the College's guidance from our COVID-19 vaccine Task force:

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI) Guidance on Risk of Allergic Reactions to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine December 14, 2020

Allergic reactions to vaccines, in general, are rare with the incidence of anaphylaxis estimated at 1.31 in 1 million doses given. With the emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine by the FDA on December 11, 2020, the ACAAI COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force recommends the following guidance for physicians and other providers related to risk of an allergic reaction on vaccination. These recommendations are based on best knowledge to date but could change at any time, pending new information and further guidance from the FDA or CDC.

  1. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine should be administered in a health care setting where anaphylaxis can be treated. All individuals must be observed for at least 20-30 minutes after injection to monitor for any adverse reaction. All anaphylactic reactions should be managed immediately with IM epinephrine as the first line treatment.
  2. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine should not be administered to individuals with a known history of a severe allergic reaction to polyethylene glycol as it is a component of this vaccine known to cause anaphylaxis.
  3. Data related to risk in individuals with a history of allergic reactions to previous vaccinations and/or mast cell activation syndrome/idiopathic anaphylaxis is very limited and evolving. A clinical decision to administer the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine should be undertaken by the physician or other provider administering the vaccine using their professional judgment and in consultation with the patient, balancing the benefits and risks associated with taking the vaccine.
  4. Individuals with common allergies to medications, foods, inhalants, insects and latex are no more likely than the general public to have an allergic reaction to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Those patients should be informed of the benefits of the vaccine versus its risks.
  5. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is not a live vaccine and can be administered to immunocompromised patients. Physicians and other providers should inform such immunocompromised patients of the possibility of a diminished immune response to the vaccine.
  6. Anyone with questions related to the risk of an allergic reaction to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine should contact their local board-certified allergist/immunologist.

References:

  • McNeil MM, Weintraub ES, Duffy J, et al. Risk of anaphylaxis after vaccination in children and adults. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;137(3):868-878. [1]
  • Dreskin et al. International Consensus (ICON): allergic reactions to vaccines. World Allergy Organization Journal (2016) 9:32. [2]
  • Wylon, K., Dölle, S. & Worm, M. Polyethylene glycol as a cause of anaphylaxis. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 12, 67 (2016). [3]
  • Stone CA, Liu Y, et al. Immediate Hypersensitivity to Polyethylene Glycols and Polysorbates: More Common Than We Have Recognized. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019; 7(5): 1533-1540. [4]

Hours of Operation

***shot clinic closes 30 minutes prior to office closing***

Southlake Office

Monday:

8:00 am-6:30 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-6:30 pm

Thursday:

7:30 am-6:30 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Fort Worth/Keller **closed 12-1pm**

Monday:

8:00 am-6:30 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Our Location

Find us on the map